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Grandma’s Deviled Eggs

Every time we visited my grandparents Yetta and Chauncey, I looked forward to when they would bring out grandma’s deviled eggs. At first I didn’t think I would like them. But one bite as a kid and I was hooked.

grandmas deviled eggs with flowers here shot
Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

Grandma’s Deviled Eggs Recipe

This classic recipe is a staple in any kosher buffet. Since it is parve (neither meat nor dairy under kosher guidelines) it can be added to any snack array or appetizer plate you may be making for when company is coming over.

Why you’ll love this recipe

I love this recipe because it tastes delicious. However, it’s also really easy to make. I mean, you cannot boil eggs wrong. Even if you crack a few, as long as they stay in boiling water long enough, you can still salvage them.

There is little to no waste with this recipe, too. The only thing you can’t eat are the eggs shells after you peel them. If you can compost them, then you’ve got a zero-waste recipe. How nice.

Ingredients in deviled eggs

  • Eggs
  • Mayonnaise or Miracle Whip.
  • Kosher salt.
  • Worcestershire sauce.
  • Mustard (yellow or brown).
  • Black pepper.
  • Paprika to taste.
deviled eggs ingredients labeled

Step by step cooking instructions

Here are the steps you’ll take to make my grandmother Yetta’s famous deviled eggs recipe.

Place eggs in a medium sized pan or dutch oven. Pro tip: if you’re making more than a dozen eggs, use a frying pan instead so the eggs can lay in a single layer. Fill the pan with water, making sure that the eggs are covered by at least ½ inch with cold water.

eggs in pan covered with water before boiling
Eggs in pan covered with water. Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

Place the pan on the stove and heat on high until the water comes to a boil.

eggs on to boil
Bring water to a boil with eggs already in the pan. Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

When the water comes to a full boil, cover the pot, turn the heat off and let the eggs sit for 12 minutes for a hard boil.

putting lid on boiling water with eggs
Once water comes to a boil, put on a lid and turn down heat. Photo credit: Leah Ingram.


The next step is moving the eggs from the pot into the ice bath. I use a mesh strainer.

scooping eggs out of boiling water
Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

To make an ice bath, fill a bowl with water and add ice cubes. Let eggs rest in the ice bath for about 10 minutes or until they are cool enough to handle easily

putting hardboiled eggs in ice bath
Putting eggs in ice bath. Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

Peel the eggs and cut them lengthwise.

cutting hardboiled eggs in half
Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

Scoop out the yolks using a spoon.

Use a spoon to sccop out yolk.
Use a spoon to scoop out yolk. Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

Place the yolks in a bowl with the mayonnaise, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, black pepper and salt. Mix thoroughly with a fork.

yolks in bowl with other ingredients
Mix yolks with other ingredients (minus paprika) in a bowl. Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

Spoon the yolk mixture back into the eggs using a small spoon. If you want to be fancy, use a pastry bag with a decorative tip.

putting mixture back in eggs
Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

Sprinkle it with paprika to taste.

filled eggs with paprika on them
Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

Recipe Notes and Expert Tips

When scooping out the yolks, try to use the smallest spoon possible. I found using a teaspoon — literally a measuring spoon in a teaspoon size — was the easiest to get the yolk out without damaging the cooked egg whites

Also, when doing the recipe for this article, I grabbed spicy brown mustard by mistake. So, this batch had extra zing, if you know what I mean. Because of that, I probably could have done without the Worcestershire sauce.

So, if you’re looking for a more mild flavor when you try making my grandma’s deviled eggs, go with yellow mustard. Or, if you have spicy brown mustard, skip the Worcestershire sauce. Next time I might try this recipe with a horseradish mustard to see how that comes out. And then I’ll definitely skip Worcestershire.

Storing grandma’s deviled eggs

If you think you’re going to be making deviled eggs on the regular and know you’ll have to store leftovers, I would recommend buying a special storage container for them. You’ll want one that has compartments to hold the eggs so they don’t slide all over the place. I like one that you can buy at Target. It is designed more so for carrying deviled eggs to a party than storing them at home. But I think it can do both.

The link I’m sharing for this container is an affiliate link, which means we get a small commission if you click through and shop. There is no cost to you. Here is that link to the deviled egg container at Target.

horizontal hero image deviled eggs
Photo credit: Leah Ingram.

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grandmas deviled eggs with flowers here shot

Grandma’s Deviled Eggs

This classic recipe is a staple in any kosher buffet. Since it is parve (neither meat nor dairy under kosher guidelines) it can be added to any snack array or appetizer plate you may be making for when company is coming over.
I love this recipe because it tastes delicious. However, it's also really easy to make. I mean, you cannot boil eggs wrong. Even if you crack a few, as long as they stay in boiling water long enough, you can still salvage them.
There is little to no waste with this recipe, too. The only thing you can't eat are the eggs shells after you peel them. If you can compost them, then you've got a zero-waste recipe. How nice. This quick and easy recipe is easy to scale and yields impressive, tasty treats.
Prep Time 30 minutes
Course Appetizer
Cuisine American, Jewish
Servings 12 half eggs
Calories 34 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 6 eggs large or extra large
  • 2 heaping tbsp Miracle Whip substitute mayonnaise if you'd like
  • ½ tsp Kosher salt
  • ½ tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tsp mustard yellow or brown
  • tsp black pepper
  • paprika to taste

Instructions
 

  • Place eggs in a medium sized pan or dutch oven.
  • Cover them by at least ½ inch with cold water.
  • Place the pan on the stove and heat on high until the water comes to a boil. When the water comes to a full boil, cover the pot, turn the heat off and let the eggs sit for 12 minutes for a hard boil.
  • Fill a bowl with ice water, enough to cover the eggs.
  • Use a strainer to move the eggs from the pot into the ice bath. Let eggs rest in the ice bath for about 10 minutes or until they are cool enough to handle easily
  • Peel the eggs and cut them lengthwise.
  • Remove the yolks and place then in in a bowl with the mayonnaise, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, black pepper and salt. Mix thoroughly with a fork.
  • Spoon the yolk mixture back into the eggs. If you want to be fancy, use a pastry bag with a decorative tip.
  • Sprinkle with paprika to taste.

Nutrition

Calories: 34kcalCarbohydrates: 1gProtein: 3gFat: 2gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 0.4gMonounsaturated Fat: 1gTrans Fat: 0.01gCholesterol: 82mgSodium: 157mgPotassium: 35mgFiber: 0.1gSugar: 0.4gVitamin A: 121IUVitamin C: 0.03mgCalcium: 13mgIron: 0.4mg

Disclaimer

Please note that nutrient values, if included with the recipe, are estimates only. Variations can occur due to product availability/substitution and manner of food preparation. Nutrition may vary based on methods of origin, preparation, freshness of ingredients, and other factors.

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